Patton Oswalt Mocks Trevor Noah Twitter Controversy With Epic Politically-Correct Joke

Truth rating: 10
Patton Oswalt Trevor Noah

By Shari Weiss

Patton Oswalt Trevor Noah

(Getty Images)

Trevor Noah Patton Oswalt

(Getty Images)

Patton Oswalt has come to Trevor Noah’s defense, posting an epic 53-tweet joke mocking the controversy surrounding the new “Daily Show” host’s old tweets.

As Gossip Cop reported, a backlash erupted online on Tuesday, less than one day after it was announced Noah will succeed Jon Stewart, when attention was called to old jokes Noah tweeted about Jews and women. The biracial South African comedian was quickly branded anti-Semitic and misogynist, though Comedy Central vowed to stand by its new star. And Noah himself responded to the outcry by tweeting, “To reduce my views to a handful of jokes that didn’t land is not a true reflection of my character, nor my evolution as a comedian.”

But Oswalt was especially outraged… over the outrage. The actor-comedian went on a Twitter diatribe that mocked the situation with an extended joke highlighting how people get offended over seemingly innocuous things. “Q: Why did the man* throw* butter* out of the window*? A: He wanted to see* butter fly*!” wrote Oswalt. He then tweeted, “‘Man’ in my previous Tweet should not be construed as privileged, misogynist or anti-trans. Nor should there be ANY assumption of said man’s race or religion.”

“It could be an African American man, Asian, or any one of the vast multi-cultural mosaic which make up the world we live in today,” continued Oswalt. “‘Man’ was simply an archaic placeholder for the ‘subject’ of the joke, and thus should not denote privilege nor exclude any sexuality, religion, nationality or offend any feelings the joke listener may or may not have or have ever experienced in the past.” He then went on to tweet similar disclaimers for all the other terms, saying, “a pre-emotive apology is meekly offered.”

Oswalt then posted, with his tongue firmly planted in his check, “Context, as we know, does not matter. Only individual words and feelings do, so as always, and from now on, no matter what the intent, aim, or satirical content the deepest apology is offered to ANYONE ANYWHERE for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER who found any offense in the previous joke.” He went on, “Jokes should always entertain. EVERY SINGLE PERSON WHO HEARS THEM. A simple series of clarifying post-joke Tweets like the ones I just sent out will insure EVERYONE a gentle, comforting chuckle.”

He added at the end, “Welcome to comedy in 2015, @Trevornoah!” It’s really worth checking out Oswalt’s Twitter feed to get the full effect, though the main idea is that comedy should be conducted without fear of consequence. TELL US: What do you think of Oswalt mocking those who were offended by Noah’s jokes? Does he have a point, or is it unfair to suggest it’s wrong to ever get upset about comedy?

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